“With all that’s going on in the world and in each of our vastly different lives, taking some time to look up and ponder at space always shows you how small we really are.”

On a recent week-long family vacation to a house along Lake Leelanau, Michigan, Loveland photographer, Joe Timmerman said that most nights were spent by the fire, watching the smoke burn towards the summer stars. “One night my parents were at the end of the backyard’s dock when they noticed a golden streak in the sky.”

Their guesses on what it was were confirmed with a news update the next morning: a new comet was passing Earth.

Comet Neowise!

Listen Neowise pronunciation

 

Timmerman said, “Within a few days, all my favorite photographers I follow were posting about Neowise. I found out it’s a three-mile wide ball of methane and ammonia, filled with rock and ice, with a tail that’s nearly a million miles long, and it is moving at 17,500 miles per hour. The last time this comet passed Earth was around 5,000 BC, and it won’t come back for another 7,000 years.”

“With all that’s going on in the world and in each of our vastly different lives, taking some time to look up and ponder at space always shows you how small we really are,” Timmerman said when he said.

Joe took the photo on July 17 around 11 PM.

How to See Comet NEOWISE

Graphic courtesy of NASASpacePlace via Wikimedia Commons.
How to spot Comet NEOWISE before it disappears for thousands of years

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