by David Miller

David Miller, Publisher and Editor

Loveland, Ohio – “What may look good on a zoning map for rezoning and what a developer is wanting to develop, may not always be in the best interest of the City of Loveland and the Loveland homeowners and taxpayers,” is what resident Dave Stanton told the Planning and Zoning Commission on May 4 during their meeting to make a decision on whether to approve 209 Drees homes on the 111-acre Graville site that had recently been annexed into the city.

You can watch his presentation in the LOVELAND MAGAZINE TV video we just published, read the prepared text of his talk, and review the financial report he presented to the Commission.

Stanton continued, “This commission needs to have a full understanding of the impacts on our existing infrastructure, impacts on the traffic, impacts on the biggest investment people make in Loveland with their homes, and the impacts on the City’s finances.”

Resident Sharon Scovanner assisted Stanton in preparing the financial report. In an interview after the Meeting, Scovanner said that there should be someone on City staff doing what she and Stanton did, as part of their job when new developments are proposed in the City.

The Commission ultimately decided to reject the re-zoning request, (Drees zoning denied) (Video interview with Lauren Enda and Sharon Scovanner after they defeat)

Let’s take a moment to understand the decisions made by this commission have both short term and long-term impacts on the Loveland community. Both positive and negative. What may look good on a zoning map for rezoning and what a developer is wanting to develop, may not always be in the best interest of the City of Loveland and the Loveland Homeowners/Taxpayers. This commission needs to have a full understanding of the impacts on our existing infrastructure, impacts on the traffic, impacts on the biggest investment people make in Loveland with their homes, and the impacts on the City’s finances. Before any SPD rezoning requests has a decision made.

What you have in front of you is a Financial Analysis Report focused on the impact of adding an additional 209 homes both in property tax and income tax. The information in the report is comprised from public data and supporting documentation from the City. 

As you can see from the Property and Income Tax summary. The City of Loveland’s annual Property Tax income for 209 homes would be $ 255,660.00. The additional costs to the City of Loveland to fully support the Drees development with Police, Fire / EMS, Roads, and Maintenance would be $ 294,099.00. This creates a deficit in spending of (-$ 38,440) annually against the Property Tax revenue income. The Property Tax analysis supported detail is included in the Financial Analysis Report.

The City of Loveland’s annual Income Tax revenue for the 209 homes would be $ 105,300.00 based on 135 homes with a median income of $ 150,000 per year. 74 patio homes would be retirees who pay no income tax. As confirmed with Mark Medlar, Director of Finance only 52% of working Loveland residents pay Loveland Income Tax. The 2022 City of Loveland budget is $ 7,965,755.00. The 2021 City of Loveland population is 13,485 which equates to $ 590.71 per resident in budget expenditures. In using conservative numbers in the increase to the City of Loveland population, based on the Drees development, would be 620.5 additional residents. With this 4.6% increase in population to a total of 14,106 residents at $ 590.71 per resident would increase the City’s annual expense budget to $ 8,332,292.00. The increase in the City’s budget of $ 366,537 to cover the new residents in comparing to the City’s income tax from the Drees Development of $ 105,300.00. This creates a deficit in expense spending of (-$ 261,237.00). The Income Tax analysis supported detail is included in the Financial Analysis Report.

This financial analysis does not include additional expenses that Drees should be responsible for regarding this development. Drees would need to pay for the improvements to O’Bannonville road to handle the additional traffic and pay for the half mile MSD sewer upgrade on O’Bannonville road. As MSD has no Capital Funds to pay for this sewer upgrade. Drees has stated in their April 22nd letter to the City of Loveland regarding infrastructure “Responsibility will be on Drees to make the necessary improvements”. The city should bare no cost for the MSD sewer upgrade and road improvements to O’Bannonville road.  

As you can see from the Financial Analysis showing the negative impact to the City of Loveland’s expenses with regards to Property and Income Tax Revenue. This is not a good Investment for the Taxpayers of Loveland and reflects deficit spending.  

Going back to my opening statement of “Understand the decisions made by this commission have both short term and long-term impacts on the Loveland community”. A decision that was made by this commission on the rezoning to Multi-Family from Medium Residential for Blossom Hill has had a direct negative impact on Sentry Hill homes. Your decisions have made some of the Sentry Hill homes unsellable based on your rezoning recommendation with Multi-Family structures being built right next to Sentry Hill.  

So again, think about your decisions being made with the full understanding of the impact to the City and the people of Loveland. 

The Grailville Archive

Because posterity may wish to know.

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