Here is a report from Wired Magazine

Hassold, formerly a digital behavior analyst for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, also notes that even extra-cautious employees may be more likely to take phishing emails at face value, since it’s not as easy to call across the room to a colleague and check whether they really initiated that payroll payment reroute. “All of this is a perfect storm,” he says.
As more people work from home and anxiety mounts, expect cyberattacks of all sorts to take advantage.

THE NOVEL CORONAVIRUS has impacted the global economy, daily life, and human health around the world, changing how people work and interact everyday. But in addition to the pressing threat the virus poses to human health, these rapid changes have also created an environment in which hackers, scammers, and spammers all thrive.

Coronavirus phishing scams started circulating in January, preying on fear and confusion about the virus—and they’ve only proliferated since. Last week, Brno University Hospital in the Czech Republic—a major Covid-19 testing hub—suffered a ransomware attack that disrupted operations and caused surgery postponements. And even sophisticated nation state hackers have been using pandemic-related traps to spread their malware. The conditions are ripe for cyberattacks of all sorts.

Read on at wired.com



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